Looking at Hurricane Hilary’s impact along the West Coast

Looking at Hurricane Hilary’s impact along the West Coast

Tropical storm Hillary makes landfall today. First stop, Mexico’s Baja California, triggering deadly flooding there.
Now the storm is making its way north into Tijuana and San Diego before drenching much of Southern California.
Also, as if we don’t have enough going on, a 5.1 magnitude earthquake centered in Ventura County, California, rattled areas around Los Angeles.
There are no reports of major damage or injuries right now, and no threat of a tsunami.
New video just into our newsroom shows heavy rain coming down in Salton City, about 60 miles south of Palm Springs and 110 miles west of Yuma.
This footage was shot by Maria Thompson.
The National Weather Service is reporting wind gusts of more than 60 miles an hour in Yuma and Imperial counties, as well as blowing dust, reducing visibility.
Now there has been rainfall throughout the day in Southern California.
This is Sherman Oaks. Floodwaters along Highway 101 near Van Nuys Boulevard.
The Los Angeles River is running high.
The California Highway Patrol says they’ve responded to dozens of incidents today in L.A. County.
Now heading to the California border with Mexico, more problems.
A rock slide shut down a stretch of I-8.
This is near Incopa.
Caltrans is urging people to just stay home.
I said that with a note of frustration.
I’m sure they’re like, people, stay home.
And if you do have to go out, travel with caution if you do.
Taking a look at San Diego County now.
Wet weather coming down in Ocean Beach.
A lot of people out today following Linda’s advice along the coastline anyway.
There’s been steady rain out there for the past few hours along with gloomy skies as you see as the storm approaches.
Now a live look at the Los Angeles skyline.
Very gloomy and doomy.
This is from Santa Monica Beach.
The camera is shaking just a bit from the winds.
But yeah, they are getting overcast skies throughout the day as well as rain.
Now heading nearby to the Santa Monica Pier.
This is video from a camera at Pacific Park.
It is raining outside.
Some people, just a few, walking around there.
The rides, understandably, on the pier are closed on what would have normally been a busy Sunday of fun.
Parts of Lake Mead are evacuated tonight over the risk of flooding from the storm.
The National Park Service closed the recreation area there on Saturday.
There are several low-lying areas and roads that are prone to flooding.
The evacuations are for visitors, residents, and workers.
The only exception, local, state, and federal employees.
The park is already dealing with several power outages from storms Friday night and one dock that separated from a marina.
Northwestern Arizona is likely to get rainfall today.
This is a live look out at Lake Havasu.
You see all those trees blowing in the wind and cloudy skies over the water near London Bridge.
Jonathan Hunt has the latest tonight.
Southern California is under its first ever tropical storm warning as Hillary hits hard.
Despite weakening winds, it still packs an enormous amount of rain.
And that could mean catastrophic flash flooding and landslides.
This is an unprecedented weather event.
Officials have warned people living near the coast to be prepared to evacuate because of the threat of a storm surge.
Meanwhile, further inland, the mountains and the high deserts could see the most intense rain.
And hundreds of thousands of people have been rushing to protect their homes and businesses with sandbags.
When they’re giving us this much warning that you need to be prepared, we hustled for sandbags.
We’ve never had to do this.
The area isn’t used to seeing this much rain in such a short amount of time.
So there are worries about whether the infrastructure can handle it.
The storm drains have litter in them and they back up really quick.
And so that’s where we get the flooding.
The U.S. Navy is taking no chances, moving several of its ships out to sea to avoid a direct hit.
Storm preparations are also being made in Las Vegas, a city where these kind of storms are almost unheard of.
It’s a little scary.
It’s because, you know, we’re in the desert.
It’s like if, you know, it floods, where are we going to go?
California Governor Gavin Newsom has declared a state of emergency to help speed up the disaster response.
In Santa Monica, Jonathan Hunt, Fox News.

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