Mets apologize to Marlins for soggy field that forced doubleheader

Mets apologize to Marlins for soggy field that forced doubleheader

This is the MetaQuest 3.
It’s shipping on October 10th for $499.
and Meta is calling it the first mainstream headset
built for mixed reality.
That means that on top of upgrading its components
and slimming down its profile from the Quest 2.
Meta has added a high-quality color
pass-through camera feed.
bringing your view from the headset
a little closer to the real world.
Here are the straightforward upgrades
to the Quest 3’s specs.
We already knew it would be slimmer than the Quest 2
thanks to a new pancake lens design
that doesn’t take up as much space.
It uses a second-generation Qualcomm Snapdragon XR2 chip.
which is supposed to give it
double the graphics performance of the Quest 2.
But it’s supposed to get roughly the same battery life.
between two and three hours.
The base version has a relatively small
128-gigabyte storage capacity.
but you can bump that up to 512 gigabytes for a price.
You can buy some new accessories too.
like face masks in different colors
and a charging dock that comes
with rechargeable controller batteries.
as well as a new version
of the more comfortable EliteStrap.
You’ll also notice that the controllers
look a little different.
The Quest 2’s controllers had an LED-studded ring
that curved over your knuckles
to help the headset track it.
Last year’s Quest Pro got rid of this ring
and replaced it with cameras
that were mounted on the controllers.
which streamlined them.
but made them more power-hungry.
The Quest 3 controllers don’t have a ring
or built-in cameras.
Meta promises that AI advances
will let them accurately track your hand position
without either of those things.
In my time with the Quest 3.
the controllers did seem to work well.
but it was a hands-on demo showing them
under the best possible conditions.
so we don’t know how they’ll perform at home.
The biggest difference.
however.
is contained in those three black notches
on the front of the headset.
The left and right ones contain
high-resolution color cameras
that can pass their feed through to your display.
The center one contains a depth sensor.
which helps the headset map your surroundings.
Combined.
they let the headset blend
in the virtual and real worlds.
so you can play a virtual tabletop game
on your coffee table.
or capture aliens rolling around your living room floor.
You can tap the headset’s right temple twice
to swap between a full virtual world
and a pass-through mixed reality one.
and Meta is promising new games and apps
that take advantage of MR.
Now.
you may have heard this promise before.
The Quest 2 had very limited
and low-resolution black-and-white pass-through.
and the Quest Pro had color pass-through
that Meta promoted as a huge selling feature.
But the Quest 3’s mixed reality
seems like a significant leap up from the Pro’s.
For one thing.
the higher-resolution display
means you’ll get more detail from the feed.
For another.
the color balance and lighting
seems dramatically improved.
I could do things like check my phone
while wearing the Quest 3.
which I generally couldn’t do with the Pro.
Again.
I saw this headset in a very controlled environment.
but I could occasionally almost forget
I was looking through a screen.
which never happened with Meta’s earlier devices.
The depth sensor also gives the headset
a better sense of your space.
Unlike the Quest 2.
the Quest 3 can automatically suggest
a boundary for your play space.
instead of making you physically draw it.
Although.
in my short time with the headset.
that physical drawing still proved more convenient.
This is all cool.
but I’m still not sure
Meta’s given me a reason to want mixed reality.
I got to try a couple of fun experiences.
but they were still at the level of physics demos
or simple couch games.
nothing as advanced or interesting
as the Quest’s best full virtual reality games.
There’s a new system called Augments
that puts persistent virtual widgets
like weather or radio in your real space.
but I’m not convinced that’s more convenient
than pulling out my phone.
And I’m a bit of a mixed reality skeptic in general.
I’m also not excited by a lot of the pitches I’ve seen
for the Apple Vision Pro.
and even bigger bet on the medium.
But the Quest 3’s core MR technology
seems promising enough that I’m excited to see
what developers do with it after launch.
For now though.
the big question seems like.
how much better the Quest 3 is at full immersive VR
than the Quest 2?
After all.
the Quest 2 is sticking around
at a much cheaper $299.
and the flagship games we’ve seen for the Quest 3.
like Assassin’s Creed Nexus VR.
will still work on the Quest 2.
Also.
without more testing.
I can’t say how much more comfortable the Quest 3
will be after long sessions.
Even with slimmer optics than its predecessors.
it’s a big bulky thing to wear on your head.
I spent my hour long demo adjusting it
to find a sweet spot where it was secure.
but not too tight.
On the other hand.
the Quest 3’s upgraded display and processor
are great news if you’re looking for detailed
and better looking graphics for standalone VR.
If the slimmer controllers still track well.
getting rid of that ring is a real improvement.
And the Quest 3’s mixed reality
feels like less of a compromise than ever before.
We’re looking forward to getting our hands
on the headset for longer.
to see if Meta’s promises hold up.

I just tried the Meta Quest 3 and it’s the VR headset I’ve always wanted

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