Olivia Rodrigo: Guts review dramatic dispatches from the dark side of youth

Olivia Rodrigo: Guts review dramatic dispatches from the dark side of youth

It’s a big week.
I know,
and this is a big week.
I feel like I haven’t really processed it yet,
but working on it.
Yeah,
how’s it feel different to the first time around?
So different.
I mean,
I think the first time around,
I’ve just just built this so much adrenaline.
I was like,
oh,
wow,
this is happening.
I’ve never done this before.
And this time,
it feels a little more real.
And it’s kind of a scary thing to know that people are going to be like curious.
And they’ll maybe have a lot of ears on it.
That’s the point,
isn’t it?
Yeah,
I mean,
I’m kind of wrecking.
Yeah,
it’s the plan.
How long is this song being kicking around?
Is this when to get him back,
sort of show up in the whole process?
Oh,
One,
it’s so funny.
I didn’t write electric,
lady studios in New York here.
And we were writing all day.
And we wrote a song that I didn’t like,
and I had like a total breakdown.
And I was like,
god,
I can’t write songs.
I’m so bad at this.
I don’t know,
like,
whatever.
Like,
being really negative.
And then we took a break and we came back.
And we wrote.
And I’m back in the front of my favorite song.
So just close to show.
Yeah,
just never give up.
Yeah,
you got to get to the press to the point of sort of letting go at that point.
Sometimes it just unlocks like even some of the deepest stuff that you need to get through.
It’s a fun song.
And it’s got a,
it’s got a sting in the towel.
Like a lot of your songs.
Olivia,
you know,
it really is.
There’s a sweet revenge to the song.
Was it fun to write?
Yeah.
Super fun to write.
I really like the chorus.
It feels like kind of sticky to me.
And feels like something that I would want like,
you know,
like a crowd to sing.
You know,
it’s very like they will.
It’s definitely an intimate get,
you know,
and I feel like the album,
you know,
it doesn’t
feel like,
you know,
that wasn’t part of the process.
Like you were definitely keen to sort of get into that place where you were going to give
something to the fans to y’all back at you.
Was that a subconscious part of that process wanting to kind of deepen that connection
between you and your audience to the songs this time?
Completely.
I mean,
subconscious book,
both subconscious and conscious.
I think I think I made sour and I had never.
I played a show before,
you know,
so it’s just me on my piano,
my bedroom,
and going on tour after,
you know,
that album came out.
I think it’s really informative to me as a songwriter.
You know,
because something that can resonate on a recording is,
you know,
maybe it doesn’t always resonate in the room full of people.
And so I think it’s really educational.
And I think I wrote this album with the tour in mind definitely.
When did you start to feel like as a performer,
you felt comfortable enough to
deliver on those first songs on the debut album?
Did it like performance wise?
Yeah,
when did it?
I mean,
the crowd loved it from the second that you went out and played because there was
that anticipation of hearing those songs in a room with each other.
The music was already successful by the time you went out and did the shows.
But how long did it take you to feel like you actually felt comfortable performing those songs?
Was it quick?
I wouldn’t say it was quick.
I mean,
I was kind of green to the whole performing thing in general.
I mean,
I,
you know,
so we had my first two performances ever were the Brits and I
and so I think I felt definitely not prepared for that.
But I think going on tour and that afternoon I,
you know,
being surrounded by so much positive good energy.
I think the confidence and also just,
you know,
repetition and practice to be more comfortable.
And I think I’m definitely more comfortable on stage now that I was a year ago.
You must be so excited about the next tour.
Not only having new songs,
but knowing that that’s a pair of shoes you can fit now.
And you can walk in really comfortably.
You know what you want to do.
And you know who you are in front of crowd,
you know?
Yeah,
I mean,
working on it.
I’m getting there.
I’m getting there.
You need to be fun.
Olivia Rodrigo is here with us brand new cover of new music daily ahead of the brand you album,
which is called Guts.
It’s coming out very soon.
The song is called Get In Back.
You know,
I caught your interview with Phoebe Bridges,
which is beautiful.
As you know at Apple Music,
we love artists talking to artists.
It’s big part of what we built this whole model around with the idea of like broadening the whole conversation space.
So artists better understand each other.
How is that experience?
Spending time talking with Phoebe,
who’s just a wonderful music musician and music fan.
Yeah.
She’s awesome.
It was so much fun talking to her.
I think she’s so smart and obviously such a brilliant songwriter.
But she’s just really,
really gracious and really down to earth.
And it’s been really nice to have some interactions with Sarah.
I know.
I think she’s just great all around.
It was a lot of fun to talk for an hour.
So we have 12 songs on this album,
which is coming out.
How many songs do you think you probably recorded with Dan and to pick out those 12?
Well,
that’s a great question.
I like 25.
That’s not anything too crazy.
That’s pretty.
That’s good.
That’s good going.
I mean,
the question is always,
you know,
where are the other 13?
And do you,
are there any that you feel you can finish or I’ll finish or we’ll see the light a day?
Or are you kind of pretty defined in terms of what the album is and what those other songs represent to it?
Yeah.
I think some of them will definitely feel the light of day.
I don’t know.
In crafting like an album track list,
it’s just very,
you know,
it’s just like intricacies like all,
you know,
too many of these songs.
And I want to save this for later and stuff like that.
So I bet some of them will feel light of day.
But Dan and I are a little bit like,
if we’re producing a song,
and we don’t feel like we’re really chatting with it.
We’re like,
oh,
it’s with one to the next one.
Yeah,
we’re not.
Before you have a nervous breakdown about how bad it is and tell him.
I know.
It happens to everybody.
And I mean,
look at everybody in everyday life.
No matter what they’re doing,
that we feel like we’re not achieving to the,
to the,
to the sort of
ourselves that has making this album help you better understand that.
Do you feel like you can be kind to yourself in this process?
Well,
you’ve been able to do it twice.
Oh gosh.
Yeah.
You know what?
I think that in general,
this album,
making this album,
has given me a lot of confidence as a songwriter.
I think I think writing the first album was so,
it just felt so spontaneous.
You know,
70 years old,
learning how to write songs for the first time.
And just like pouring my heart out of it so much to say.
And I think this time,
I was in a different place and I was having a lot of pressure.
And,
you know,
a lot of expectations placed on me.
And I think I really had to try to walk out the noise and just focus on like the craft of songwriting.
And I wasn’t,
you know,
going through my first 70 year old heartbreak.
And I think that it sort of forced me to be maybe a little bit more creative in the way that I write.
Interesting though,
like when you’re 17,
you’re going through heartbreak.
That’s about as pure and experienced and pure and emotion as you can ever feel.
I think the older we get,
the more barriers we put up to that experience.
And the less honest and genuinely is,
I think you feel things the first time it’s real.
And I think that you really capture that on your first album.
And sort of,
I sort of wonder,
like,
you know,
what you captured first on this album.
Where,
where you went on this album that you feel is the pureest place when you listen back to it.
Yeah,
you know,
it’s funny.
Because I feel like when you’re making the album,
you can’t really see the forest of the trees a little bit about like,
about what you’re trying to get across.
And then you just like wake up and go into the studio and see what comes out of you.
But in hindsight,
I think that a lot of the album is about sort of the confusion that comes with becoming a young adult and figure out your place in this world.
And you want to be in,
you know,
want to hang out with and all of that stuff.
And I think that that’s probably an experience that everyone has had in their life before it’s just that kind of rising from that disillusionment.
Yeah.
The album is called guts.
Liver rorigo.
I think you speak into us from New York.
You mentioned litric lady being in the same cities where you are right now.
The relocation we caught up with the last time you were sitting in a room with no furniture.
I’m assuming that you’ve been able to fill it out to some degree in life as kind of taking it’s taken.
It’s,
it’s,
it’s place.
Yeah,
I was thinking about that.
I was thinking about that earlier.
I’m like,
gosh,
last time I was in,
like,
moving in this empty apartment.
But now I have a cow out of a dining table.
Oh,
the normal stuff.
It’s so great.
I’m like,
living large.
I’m pleased to hear it.
Is there a song on the album that you think about it?
Because we’re about to hear it in full as fans are sort of presented with this body of work.
Is there an album on here that you are particularly proud of or you feel like you were able to,
to go somewhere you hadn’t been before as a writer?
I think.
I really love the song.
I can,
it’s one of my favorite songs I’ve ever written.
And I think it,
I really love the lyrics.
And I think it,
it expresses something that I’ve been trying to express since I was like 15 years old.
This sort of repressed,
you know,
anger and,
and feeling of,
you know,
confusion trying to be like,
put into a box as a girl.
And so yeah,
I think that that’s one of my favorite songs on the record.
It’s the first song on the album.
The track listing is up on Apple Music right now.
You can pre-ed the album,
which is called Gut.
The last song is called Teenage Dream.
I’m obsessed with song one,
I’m obsessed with the last song.
Because if an artist takes the time to put songs in some kind of order to create a narrative,
then the way it ends is really important.
What is teenage dream saying to fans of the music when they hear the album?
Why is it so important it ended the record?
Yeah.
Ironically,
there’s a through the first song we wrote for the record.
That made it on to the record.
And the last line is the line that I really love.
And it kind of ends the album on a on a question mark.
The line is like,
they all say that it gets better.
It gets better the more you grow.
They all say that it gets better.
What I do.
And I like that it like kind of is like an ending.
But it’s also sort of a question mark.
And it’s kind of leading it up in the air.
Like with this next chapter is going to be.
And,
you know,
it’s still,
it’s still sort of confused.
But it feels like a,
like,
a final note to that confusion.
A final question.
Congratulations on finishing the album.
You know,
you had an unprecedented debut experience.
To come out with the second album now,
and to be able to deliver from fans and on that promises is a huge achievement.
So congratulations,
Olivia.
And thanks for some time and good luck in the next couple of days.
Oh,
thanks,
Ian.
I was such a pleasure talking to you.

 

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