Rosh Hashanah 2023: Jewish New Year arrives at sundown Friday night

Rosh Hashanah 2023: Jewish New Year arrives at sundown Friday night

Well.
Shana Tova.
from us on the stream.
the Jewish holiday of Rosh Hashanah begins at
sundown tonight and marks the beginning of the Jewish New Year.
That was good.
Brad.
Thank you.
Yes.
Joining us now with someone who knows much more about this.
Shana Conover from Temple
Sholem.
Welcome.
Thank you for being here.
Thanks for having me.
We are entering the new year.
5784.
Can you explain to us the significance of the Hebrew calendar?
Absolutely.
So it was that they thought when they were first putting the calendar together.
so thousands
of years ago.
they thought the universe is not billions of years old.
If they were thinking about how old it could be.
they were thinking.
oh.
it’s got to be
like hundreds or even thousands of years old.
but they couldn’t think in billions.
So now we have reached from that time of their counting.
them counting backwards.
then them
thinking that this is 5784.
So once we started that calendar year that way.
then we’re going to acknowledge that
this new year.
which starts in the fall on the first of Tishrei.
the Hebrew month.
that
it is going to be then 5784.
Okay.
Jewish people will listen to the sound of the shofar Saturday and Sunday.
What is a shofar?
And it is considered a mitzvah to hear it being sounded.
a mitzvah being a good deed?
A mitzvah is a good deed.
but literally mitzvah is commandment.
So we’re commanded to hear the shofar.
Because we’re commanded.
many of the commandments that we have are good deeds.
things that we
should be doing for one another.
Then we call a good deed a mitzvah also.
more colloquially.
So to hear the shofar.
the shofar is a ram’s horn.
and we hear it in order to be almost
like an alarm clock to say.
here’s how we want to actually do something spiritually
for ourselves to start this new year off right.
And so we do that to.
in some ways.
Reme ourselves.
remember the best parts of ourselves.
put ourselves back together in the beginning of a new year.
I’m learning so much today.
from this to Hispanic heritage.
I love that we’re digging into culture this morning.
and a major custom.
Rabbi.
that we
want to talk about is challah.
Did I say it correctly?
You did.
Can you talk more about that for us?
Yeah.
So challah is a sweet bread that we make with eggs.
and we braid it in order to make it
beautiful and decorative.
And we have that every Shabbat.
that’s a way in which we.
and every festival.
that’s a
way that we welcome in the sacred time.
and to be able to do it in a way that sweetens
the occasion.
And on Rosh Hashanah.
what we do is we have a circle challah.
So the challah is in the shape of a circle.
It also is braided and beautiful and sweet.
And what’s fun also is that we do that to say we want to have a beautiful new year.
we’re marking our time in the sacred way.
and we also sometimes will put a little cinnamon.
we’ll do something to make it just a little extra sweet.
I heard you say Rosh Hashanah.
too.
Google says Rosh Hashanah.
but a Jewish coworker says Rosh Hashanah.
Is there some debate there.
or dialect.
or should it be Rosh?
I have to say.
Google could use a little improvement.
It is Rosh.
Rosh is head.
so this is the head.
Shana is year.
so this is Rosh Hashanah is head of the year.
Okay.
And you talked about sweets.
and apple and honey are also part of some customs with this.
Can you talk about how that’s tied in as well?
Yeah.
absolutely.
What we want to do is just make sure that in this time of year.
we’re able to dip into
the beautiful things that are around us.
including that this is apple season.
And so to be able to be in tune with the rhythm of the year and the nature.
So we love to have apples and honey to be able to sweeten this year.
We now have honey that we have from bees.
but often it was in the past date honey.
because
that is something that then ties us to the land of Israel as well.
Okay.
Well.
thank you so much for sharing this with us.
We really appreciate you helping us just understand more.
Yeah.
it really is insightful.
Shoshana Conover from Sholem.
correct?
Temple Sholem?
Mm-hmm.
Temple Sholem.
Thank you for being here with us.
We appreciate your time.
It’s been great to be with you.
Thank you.
Yeah.
it’s our pleasure.

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